Herbs and Garlic Scapes

  • Herbs and garlic scapes at Save-On-Foods in Terra Nova.
  • Garlic scapes at Galloway’s Specialty Foods in Richmond

Galloway’s and Save-On-Foods are both strong supporters of our community farm. Thank you!

Proceeds from the sale of farm products help us in our mission to grow fresh fruits and vegetables for the Richmond Food Bank, community meal programs, and other neighbours in need.

Herb Tips

The Healing Garden where we grow most of our herbs

When cooking, 1 tsp dried herbs = 3 tsp fresh

Store fresh herbs just as you would cut flowers: trim the stem end, and stand the bundle in a jar with a little water. For longer storage, or if your house is quite warm, put the herbs in the fridge.

Keep dried herbs in a cool, dry DARK place. Exposure to light can reduce the potency of the herb. Dried herbs retain their potency for about 12 months. When your dried herbs have lost their aroma, it’s time to replace. Put the dried herbs in the compost.

Using Herbs

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Lemon Thyme

Thyme

Good with cabbage, carrots, corn, eggplant, lamb, leeks, legumes, meats, mushrooms, onions, potatoes, tomatoes. Dry the flowers to use as a peppery spice. Lemon thyme is particularly nice with fish. Withstands long cooking, so good for soups and stews. Classic ingredient in French and Spanish dishes.
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Oregano

Oregano

Quite a pungent flavour. Classic ingredient in Greek, Spanish, Mexican and Italian dishes. Most often used dried.
Good with anchovies, artichokes, beans, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, cheese dishes, corn, eggplant, eggs, fish/shellfish, lamb, mushrooms, onions, pork, potatoes, poultry,spinach, squash, sweet peppers, tomatoes, veal, venison.
We grow oregano, golden oregano and greek oregano.
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Golden Majoram

Marjoram

Related to oregano and mint, but has a more delicate flavour. Best used at the end of cooking, or for raw dishes.
Good for salads, egg dishes and mushroom sauces, fish and poultry, salads and mild cheeses.
We grow marjoram and golden marjoram.
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Sage

Sage

Believed to aid in the digestion of fatty and oily foods. Usually associated with duck, fatty pork and goose. Classic flavouring for turkey (which is not fatty…)
Good with apples, dried beans, cheese, onions, tomatoes.
An integral part of Saltimbocca, a quickly cooked Italian meat or poultry dish.
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Ricola Mint

Mint

A versatile herb, which can be used in both sweet and savoury dishes. An important ingredient in Greek, Turkish and Middle Eastern dishes. Chop and add fresh leaves to fresh fruit, or to tabouleh salad (couscous, parsley, onion and mint).
Fresh leaves are an important part of the rum cocktail, Mojito. Dried mint is more suitable for meat dishes and cucumber/yogurt salad.
We grow spearmint, apple mint and ricola mint.
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Bouquet Garni is a “little bundle of herbs”. Sprigs of sage, thyme, celery leaves and parsley can be tied with string or put into a teabag before adding to soups or stews.

Infused vinegars

Put fresh herbs in a jar, and cover with white wine vinegar. Cap the jar and set aside to steep for 1 week to 6 months. Strain out the herbs and keep the vinegar in a cool dark place, or refrigerate. Use for salad dressings and marinades.

How to dry herbs

Cut stalks of herbs and tie together with string or an elastic band. Keep bunches small enough so that air can circulate. Hang the bundles in a place with good air circulation; protect from bright light if possible. A 1/2” bundle may dry in 3-7 days.
OR
Remove leaves from stems. Place in a mesh bag, and spread on a (cake/cookie) cooling rack in a breezy, sunny spot.

Herb Flowers

Herb and edible flowers create a beautiful salad with little effort

Flowers can be used fresh as garnishes for salads or savoury dishes. Mint flowers are great garnishes for dessert. Dried herb flowers can be used for seasoning cooked dishes. The vibrant purple of chive flowers are wonderful in salads or as a garnish. Taste the flowers before using.

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